It’s me, Henning

Yes, I am alive. And I am posting. Melissa has done a great job of keeping you informed about my health and our struggles (or at least a few of them)

Now I feel well enough that I can post regularly here so that is what I am planning to do. My first post is about our trip to Sweden and about how good human interactions make the world of a difference – also when it comes to health care.

We went to Sweden for a few days and I decided to go to Jönköping for dialysis even though it was 200 km (120 miles) from my dad’s place where we stayed in Sweden. There was really only one reason for going that far for dialysis and that was curiosity. I wanted to see how a well run dialysis unit could look. I had a feeling that this one was such a unit because of a chance encounter with a single person with whom I had shared only a few words ever, namely the head nurse at their limited care unit, Britt-Mari Banck.

I had met Britt-Mari at a conference about patient empowerment that I attended in November last year. Britt-Mari had an energy about her at the conference that told me that she not only loved her job, she truly cared for her patients and her job. She had a genuine interest in the wellbeing of the people she worked with and saw every day – something I have seen very little of from the professionals I have encountered in Denmark so far (with a few exceptions – and you know who you are). They might act the part of caring and good Samaritans but any real interest in making life better for their patients is far removed from what they perceive as being part of their job.

So we got up at 5:30 to drive the long way north on E4. It was a beautiful drive in the Swedish winter wonderland, past endless rows of trees powdered with newly fallen snow. The van was nice and warm compared to the freezing temperatures outside.

The ward was very nice. Melissa immediately noticed how clean everything was while I was busy saying hi to Britt-Mari and her staff. They were all very professional and knew the drill but at the same time they were kind, caring and curious about us. Friendliness and warmth was the game changer.

I was assigned to Bengt, the nurse who had started the ward with Britt-Mari. Both of them being well experienced dialysis nurses had decided to start something new and different and I have to say they had done a great job. The patients I talked to there were very happy to be at this particular unit. They all had great things to say about it and one compared it very favorable to both Danish and Swedish wards she had been to.

I can’t exactly say what it was that made it so special other than it was the people running it and their involvement in their job. But an incident that I encountered there might be a good example of it. The first day we were there Britt-Mari came up to me with a questionnaire from a design student that had contacted her about improving the dialysis experience for patients, both in center and at home.

He basically asked what problems/issues we had encountered in connection to dialysis and then he asked about possible solutions to those problems. After taking the questionnaire home to work with us we recognized five problem areas that all were of great importance to the dialysis experience.

The five areas are:

  • Equipment, the size and look of the machines and chairs
  • units, everything from bureaucracy to lack of cleanliness at the units
  • structural aspects, how everything is run by doctors and manufacturers
  • human interaction, between professional and patient
  • psychological aspects of dialysis, support, understanding and knowledge of dialysis.

Now, my experience was that all five aspects were handled way better at Jönköping than they have been handled at my Danish ward. It felt much less like being in a hospital than I had experienced before, which in turn made it feel much more like they were normalizing the experience instead of making it into a treatment regime where one is automatically made to feel like a patient.

This morning I read something that brought the experience home for me. I had been pondering for days what it was that made this experience so different from the ones I had encountered previously and suddenly this was brought to my attention:

It is easy to teach a caring person skills but it is much harder to teach a skilled person to care.

That is exactly what made the difference at that ward. It was full of caring people who also happened to be highly qualified. But they all knew that no amount of qualification would make up for a lack of care and involvement.

Next time I will talk a little more about the questionnaire and the specifics of our categories.

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