Fistula success at last!!

Last week, Henning had his fistula scanned. Everything looks fine, so they decided to begin using it on Wednesday. The first stick, the nurse went straight through the fistula. He still has the catheter, so while he iced his arm and applied pressure, he was able to complete dialysis. He came home with a small bump and bruise that spread quite widely.

Friday, they tried again, and managed to use the fistula for venous access. He still used the catheter for the arterial access, and the fistula worked well the entire session. Success!!! If only partial. His pressure was great, and everyone was happy. But it also bruised pretty significantly. Hmm….

Today (Monday) they used the fistula for venous access only, but are concerned the fistula is not “quite ready” because of the bruising. *sigh* His vascular surgeon was sure it was “quite ready” weeks before… and offered to draw on Henning’s arm if necessary. Since Henning has a follow-up with him tomorrow, I’m wondering if Henning will come home with new ink…

In any case, slow progress is still progress. As long as the pressure is good, his cleanings are good, and he feels good (relatively speaking), I am happy. I wish it were all happening faster, but I feel that way about everything, usually.

Henning also has an appointment with the cardiologist tomorrow. While his blood pressure and pulse issues have responded to medication, they are fitting him with a halter to do a 24-hour check. The last time he had this appointment, he had to walk out before they saw him because they were so short-staffed and running hours behind schedule. He was going to miss dialysis if he stayed in the cardiology ward, so chose to abandon that appointment in favor of dialysis. His appointment with the surgeon tomorrow is two hours AFTER the cardiologist, so I hope they are doing better with scheduling. Afer all, a two-hour grace period should be MORE than enough.

*Fingers crossed*

No news…

…is good news, right??

As an excuse for not posting recently, it’s a good one, no?

I have stopped going to dialysis with Henning, so I have far less to report lately. He tells me all is well there. I stopped because while it is important for me to know about the machine and how to set it up, tear it down, etc. for when he comes home, I felt that my presence was hindering HIS learning process. He was becoming snappy and irritable with me. On top of that there were issues with his blood pressure and pulse, and his stress over our different learning styles was not helping… So one day, after he totally lost it on me after I recorded what he was sure was a false reading, I just walked out on him. There are nurses there to do what I was doing, after all. And they get paid. It works better this way, I think.

The only down side is… Henning isn’t a great historian, as we used to say during intake when I worked at the hospital, so… I didn’t have much to pass along.

But now I do:

Henning has regular blood work, and his numbers are fantastic. His levels of the more troublesome minerals are within normal limits, for the most part. Normal for healthy people. Which is practically miraculous.

He also just had a kt/V test, and the results are good. He is dialyzing efficiently, and getting good clearance. That news, combined with his usual blood work results, tells us that he is doing fantastic!

His dietician, Eva, is wonderful. I can’t say enough good things about her. She  has a passion for her work that surpasses probably everyone’s I have seen here in Denmark, so far. She also has a great sense of humor. She’s the one that told us months ago that Henning’s numbers were miraculous for not being on dialysis. The last time we saw her, she said, “I don’t often see numbers like this with dialysis patients. Actually, I never have.” LOL

She discussed healthy food choices, but we also talked about empowerment, how to get the patient to BE the hub of their own health care team. I really enjoy talking to her. If every medical professional had her passion and COMpassion for their patients it would transform medicine.

Henning is still dialyzing via catheter. The fistula seems to be doing well, but no one has dared stick it yet. Henning is getting it scanned soon, and if the nurses continue to be hesitant, the vascular surgeon (Johnny) has offered to draw pictures on Henning’s arm along with directions… *sigh* Johnny has actually done that before, he’s not even kidding. Unlike Eva, the man has very little sense of humor.

Medically, Henning is doing great. But he is still often tired and itchy and “spacey”. Since we know it is not directly related to dialysis or his diet, we are looking at other possible sources for his lack of feeling “well”. It may be exercise, it could be all the stress of the past many months catching up with him, it could be many things. But since it is not caused by anything medically acute, we can relax a bit and take some time just “being” while we investigate.

Our marriage took place amid a whirlwind of medical drama and stress, so we are taking a delayed Honeymoon soon. I am looking forward to this time away from our regular life: house, job, kids, illness, stress… and when we come back, I hope we will both be rested, refreshed and newly ready to tackle what life tosses our way.